Mark Jordans et alarticle: Role of current perceived needs in explaining the association between past trauma exposure and distress in humanitarian settings in Jordan and Nepal

British Journal of Psychiatry: Role of current perceived needs in explaining the association
between past trauma exposure and distress in humanitarian
settings in Jordan and Nepal, Jordans et al. Populations affected by humanitarian emergencies such as those involving natural disasters, conflict or war are often exposed to a wide range of stressors, with elevated levels of distress and mental disorders commonly found in these settings.1–5 Historically, there has been a heavy emphasis placed within relevant research and mental health interventions on potentially traumatic events experienced during the emergency (for instance exposure to violence, torture, forced recruitment to fight, loss of home or loved ones, etc.), and the effects these have on emergency-affected people’s mental health. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has featured most prominently as the mental health outcome indicator of choice in evaluation studies.6–9 Recent reviews and other studies have confirmed that experience of torture, violence, conflict and other potentially traumatic events are strongly associated with mental disorders, such as PTSD and depression.1,5,6

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